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What Is the Maritime Administration (MARAD)?

It’s certainly not a radical statement to say that the maritime sector in the United States plays an essential role in the maintenance of the nation’s economy and its military force. Corporations rely on the maritime transportation system to deliver goods safely and efficiently across the country and to foreign lands. In addition, the merchant marine serves the dual role of promoting maritime commerce and providing auxiliary support to national defense and emergency response efforts.

Given the centrality of the maritime sector, it makes sense that its various activities and responsibilities would be coordinated by a federal agency. This is where the Maritime Administration (MARAD) comes into the picture.

MARAD is one of the agencies controlled by the U.S. Department of Transportation (others include the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Highway Administration), and throughout its history, it has proven to be highly effective in overseeing the waterborne transportation sector. For maritime employees, understanding what MARAD does is important, as this organization touches on a wide range of matters relevant to this industry.

Maritime Administration

A Brief History of the Maritime Administration

The United States Maritime Administration was formed in 1950 in order to take over many of the regulatory responsibilities that had been handled by the recently dissolved United States Maritime Commission, which had been founded in 1936.

In 1961, MARAD expanded its scope of duties by assuming control of subsidization of the construction of merchant ships, a task that had previously been managed by the United States Federal Maritime Board (1950-1961). MARAD became an official administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) in 1981, and it has remained under the oversight of this federal cabinet department ever since.

History of the Maritime Administration

The Maritime Administrator

The head of MARAD is known as the Maritime Administrator. The occupant of this office reports to the Secretary of Transportation and advises them on matters pertaining to the U.S. maritime industry. Additionally, the Maritime Administrator serves as Commandant of the United States Maritime Service, the Chairperson of the Maritime Subsidy Board, and Director of the National Shipping Authority.

At the present time, the position of Maritime Administrator is held by Rear Admiral Mark H. “Buz” Buzby, USN, Ret., formerly president of the National Defense Transportation Association, who was officially sworn in on August 8, 2017.

Role of Maritime Administration

The Role(s) of the Maritime Administration

In 2017, MARAD commanded an operating budget of $399 million and employed more than 750 personnel, who were spread among MARAD headquarters, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, and various fleet sites and gateway offices.1 These dedicated professionals are involved with supporting and managing many different facets of the maritime sector in America.

Let’s explore the some of the activities in which MARAD is engaged as part of its mission to promote the U.S. waterborne transportation sector.

  • Cargo Regulation – MARAD has the task of overseeing the transportation of the nation’s military and agricultural cargo in accordance with all applicable laws and statutes. Among these laws are the Cargo Preference Act of 1954, which mandates that at least 50% of cargo generated by the government be carried on privately owned commercial vessels that fly the U.S. flag, and the Military Cargo Preference Act of 1904, which requires all water-transported items intended for military use to be carried by vessels that fly the U.S. flag. To address the need for the ready availability of U.S.-flag, Jones Act-qualified ships, MARAD routinely assists public entities in their efforts to locate such vessels.
  • The Office of Maritime Security – Another MARAD department, the Office of Maritime Security is involved with various efforts to protect the maritime industry from pirates, terrorists, and other criminal threats. MARAD has aided the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Coast Guard in their attempts to combat piracy on the high seas in line with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Furthermore, the Office is involved with efforts to enforce the National Maritime Domain Awareness Plan (2013), intended to bolster maritime security on the global level, and provides support to the DHS in allocating port security grants to entities at the local and state levels.
  • Office of Safety – This MARAD department is involved with developing safety standards for the national and international maritime industry, as well as promoting advances in practices and technology to protect the welfare of maritime personnel.
  • Port Conveyance and Port Licensing Programs – MARAD helps federal agencies and departments comply with the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, which compels such entities to transfer unneeded property to other agencies that need it. Since the 90s, the Administration has also had the authority to convey this property to state and local governments for the development of port facilities. In addition, MARAD licenses offshore liquefied natural gas and oil import/export port facilities in accordance with the Deepwater Port Act of 1974.
  • National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) – MARAD manages this small fleet of inactive ships for the purpose of providing auxiliary support, as needed, for national emergency response efforts. As of July 31, 2014, the NDRF consisted of 114 ships.2
  • Ready Reserve Force (RRF) – Since 1976, MARAD’s Ready Reserve Force has served a backup support for the U.S. armed forces, especially the Army and Marine Corps. The RRF has been involved in Operation Desert Storm and the Hurricane Katrina response effort.
  • Ship Disposal and Dismantling – MARAD runs a Ship Disposal Program to enable the agency to safely dispose of old vessels that are no longer adequate for national security purposes. The agencies achieve this goal through sales to domestic ship recyclers, participation in the U.S. Navy’s SINKEX “live fire” training exercises, and providing vessels for use as artificial offshore reefs.
  • Federal Ship Financing Program (Title XI) – The agency takes part in Title XI financing, which is intended to bolster the U.S. merchant marine by funding the construction (or reconstruction) of vessels in compliance with environmentally friendly policies. The Program gives ship owners the opportunity to purchase vessels at affordable rates (low interest and long repayment terms) from U.S. shipyards. It also provides financial support to shipyards seeking to modernize their facilities.
  • The United States Merchant Marine Academy – MARAD is responsible for administrating the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA), in Kings Point, NY. This is one of the five military academies charged with the task of producing commissioned officers for the various armed forces. Graduates of the Academy go on to serve in the merchant marine or in the U.S. military. MARAD also provides funding to California Maritime Academy, Great Lakes Maritime Academy, Maine Maritime Academy, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the State University of New York Maritime College, and Texas A&M Maritime Academy.
  • The MARAD History Program – The Maritime Administration is also involved in preserving its own history, as well as that of the U.S. maritime industry as a whole. To that end, it operates the American Merchant Marine Museum and, through the Maritime Administration Artifact Loan Program, lends valuable historical artifacts to non-profit organizations and other public museums. It also maintains the MARAD Vessel History Database, which has data on over 12,000 vessels, past and present.

Given its role in enforcing the provisions of the Jones Act, battling piracy on the high seas, and promoting safety in shipbuilding and maritime employment conditions, the Maritime Administration is a name that sometimes arises in connection with offshore personal injury cases.

If you have or a loved one has been seriously injured while performing duties as a maritime or offshore employee, you should contact the maritime law firm Maintenance & Cure at 1-800-836-5830. A free consultation is available.

Sources

  1. https://www.marad.dot.gov/about-us/maritime-administration-at-a-glance/
  2. https://www.marad.dot.gov/wp-content/uploads/pdf/i140731.pdf
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What Is the Maritime Administration (MARAD)?

It’s certainly not a radical statement to say that the maritime sector in the United States plays an essential role in the maintenance of the nation’s economy and its military force. Corporations rely on the maritime transportation system to deliver goods safely and efficiently across the country and to foreign lands. In addition, the merchant marine serves the dual role of promoting maritime commerce and providing auxiliary support to national defense and emergency response efforts.

Given the centrality of the maritime sector, it makes sense that its various activities and responsibilities would be coordinated by a federal agency. This is where the Maritime Administration (MARAD) comes into the picture.

MARAD is one of the agencies controlled by the U.S. Department of Transportation (others include the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Highway Administration), and throughout its history, it has proven to be highly effective in overseeing the waterborne transportation sector. For maritime employees, understanding what MARAD does is important, as this organization touches on a wide range of matters relevant to this industry.

Maritime Administration

A Brief History of the Maritime Administration

The United States Maritime Administration was formed in 1950 in order to take over many of the regulatory responsibilities that had been handled by the recently dissolved United States Maritime Commission, which had been founded in 1936.

In 1961, MARAD expanded its scope of duties by assuming control of subsidization of the construction of merchant ships, a task that had previously been managed by the United States Federal Maritime Board (1950-1961). MARAD became an official administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) in 1981, and it has remained under the oversight of this federal cabinet department ever since.

History of the Maritime Administration

The Maritime Administrator

The head of MARAD is known as the Maritime Administrator. The occupant of this office reports to the Secretary of Transportation and advises them on matters pertaining to the U.S. maritime industry. Additionally, the Maritime Administrator serves as Commandant of the United States Maritime Service, the Chairperson of the Maritime Subsidy Board, and Director of the National Shipping Authority.

At the present time, the position of Maritime Administrator is held by Rear Admiral Mark H. “Buz” Buzby, USN, Ret., formerly president of the National Defense Transportation Association, who was officially sworn in on August 8, 2017.

Role of Maritime Administration

The Role(s) of the Maritime Administration

In 2017, MARAD commanded an operating budget of $399 million and employed more than 750 personnel, who were spread among MARAD headquarters, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, and various fleet sites and gateway offices.1 These dedicated professionals are involved with supporting and managing many different facets of the maritime sector in America.

Let’s explore the some of the activities in which MARAD is engaged as part of its mission to promote the U.S. waterborne transportation sector.

  • Cargo Regulation – MARAD has the task of overseeing the transportation of the nation’s military and agricultural cargo in accordance with all applicable laws and statutes. Among these laws are the Cargo Preference Act of 1954, which mandates that at least 50% of cargo generated by the government be carried on privately owned commercial vessels that fly the U.S. flag, and the Military Cargo Preference Act of 1904, which requires all water-transported items intended for military use to be carried by vessels that fly the U.S. flag. To address the need for the ready availability of U.S.-flag, Jones Act-qualified ships, MARAD routinely assists public entities in their efforts to locate such vessels.
  • The Office of Maritime Security – Another MARAD department, the Office of Maritime Security is involved with various efforts to protect the maritime industry from pirates, terrorists, and other criminal threats. MARAD has aided the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Coast Guard in their attempts to combat piracy on the high seas in line with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Furthermore, the Office is involved with efforts to enforce the National Maritime Domain Awareness Plan (2013), intended to bolster maritime security on the global level, and provides support to the DHS in allocating port security grants to entities at the local and state levels.
  • Office of Safety – This MARAD department is involved with developing safety standards for the national and international maritime industry, as well as promoting advances in practices and technology to protect the welfare of maritime personnel.
  • Port Conveyance and Port Licensing Programs – MARAD helps federal agencies and departments comply with the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, which compels such entities to transfer unneeded property to other agencies that need it. Since the 90s, the Administration has also had the authority to convey this property to state and local governments for the development of port facilities. In addition, MARAD licenses offshore liquefied natural gas and oil import/export port facilities in accordance with the Deepwater Port Act of 1974.
  • National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) – MARAD manages this small fleet of inactive ships for the purpose of providing auxiliary support, as needed, for national emergency response efforts. As of July 31, 2014, the NDRF consisted of 114 ships.2
  • Ready Reserve Force (RRF) – Since 1976, MARAD’s Ready Reserve Force has served a backup support for the U.S. armed forces, especially the Army and Marine Corps. The RRF has been involved in Operation Desert Storm and the Hurricane Katrina response effort.
  • Ship Disposal and Dismantling – MARAD runs a Ship Disposal Program to enable the agency to safely dispose of old vessels that are no longer adequate for national security purposes. The agencies achieve this goal through sales to domestic ship recyclers, participation in the U.S. Navy’s SINKEX “live fire” training exercises, and providing vessels for use as artificial offshore reefs.
  • Federal Ship Financing Program (Title XI) – The agency takes part in Title XI financing, which is intended to bolster the U.S. merchant marine by funding the construction (or reconstruction) of vessels in compliance with environmentally friendly policies. The Program gives ship owners the opportunity to purchase vessels at affordable rates (low interest and long repayment terms) from U.S. shipyards. It also provides financial support to shipyards seeking to modernize their facilities.
  • The United States Merchant Marine Academy – MARAD is responsible for administrating the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA), in Kings Point, NY. This is one of the five military academies charged with the task of producing commissioned officers for the various armed forces. Graduates of the Academy go on to serve in the merchant marine or in the U.S. military. MARAD also provides funding to California Maritime Academy, Great Lakes Maritime Academy, Maine Maritime Academy, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the State University of New York Maritime College, and Texas A&M Maritime Academy.
  • The MARAD History Program – The Maritime Administration is also involved in preserving its own history, as well as that of the U.S. maritime industry as a whole. To that end, it operates the American Merchant Marine Museum and, through the Maritime Administration Artifact Loan Program, lends valuable historical artifacts to non-profit organizations and other public museums. It also maintains the MARAD Vessel History Database, which has data on over 12,000 vessels, past and present.

Given its role in enforcing the provisions of the Jones Act, battling piracy on the high seas, and promoting safety in shipbuilding and maritime employment conditions, the Maritime Administration is a name that sometimes arises in connection with offshore personal injury cases.

If you have or a loved one has been seriously injured while performing duties as a maritime or offshore employee, you should contact the maritime law firm Maintenance & Cure at 1-800-836-5830. A free consultation is available.

Sources

  1. https://www.marad.dot.gov/about-us/maritime-administration-at-a-glance/
  2. https://www.marad.dot.gov/wp-content/uploads/pdf/i140731.pdf
Jones Act Lawyer

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We have board certified personal injury trial lawyers prepared to take on your case. Details

 

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Newsweek Leaders in Maritime
FREE confidential case Evaluation
Contact our experienced maritime attorneys to see if you have a case.

 
 
 
 
 

* Please be aware that your submission of this contact form does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

Jones Act Lawyer

tbls

We have board certified personal injury trial lawyers prepared to take on your case. Details

 

bbb

Newsweek Leaders in Maritime
Recently
Filed Cases

What Is the Maritime Administration (MARAD)?

It’s certainly not a radical statement to say that the maritime sector in the United States plays an essential role in the maintenance of the nation’s economy and its military force. Corporations rely on the maritime transportation system to deliver goods safely and efficiently across the country and to foreign lands. In addition, the merchant marine serves the dual role of promoting maritime commerce and providing auxiliary support to national defense and emergency response efforts.

Given the centrality of the maritime sector, it makes sense that its various activities and responsibilities would be coordinated by a federal agency. This is where the Maritime Administration (MARAD) comes into the picture.

MARAD is one of the agencies controlled by the U.S. Department of Transportation (others include the Federal Aviation Administration and the Federal Highway Administration), and throughout its history, it has proven to be highly effective in overseeing the waterborne transportation sector. For maritime employees, understanding what MARAD does is important, as this organization touches on a wide range of matters relevant to this industry.

Maritime Administration

A Brief History of the Maritime Administration

The United States Maritime Administration was formed in 1950 in order to take over many of the regulatory responsibilities that had been handled by the recently dissolved United States Maritime Commission, which had been founded in 1936.

In 1961, MARAD expanded its scope of duties by assuming control of subsidization of the construction of merchant ships, a task that had previously been managed by the United States Federal Maritime Board (1950-1961). MARAD became an official administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) in 1981, and it has remained under the oversight of this federal cabinet department ever since.

History of the Maritime Administration

The Maritime Administrator

The head of MARAD is known as the Maritime Administrator. The occupant of this office reports to the Secretary of Transportation and advises them on matters pertaining to the U.S. maritime industry. Additionally, the Maritime Administrator serves as Commandant of the United States Maritime Service, the Chairperson of the Maritime Subsidy Board, and Director of the National Shipping Authority.

At the present time, the position of Maritime Administrator is held by Rear Admiral Mark H. “Buz” Buzby, USN, Ret., formerly president of the National Defense Transportation Association, who was officially sworn in on August 8, 2017.

Role of Maritime Administration

The Role(s) of the Maritime Administration

In 2017, MARAD commanded an operating budget of $399 million and employed more than 750 personnel, who were spread among MARAD headquarters, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, and various fleet sites and gateway offices.1 These dedicated professionals are involved with supporting and managing many different facets of the maritime sector in America.

Let’s explore the some of the activities in which MARAD is engaged as part of its mission to promote the U.S. waterborne transportation sector.

  • Cargo Regulation – MARAD has the task of overseeing the transportation of the nation’s military and agricultural cargo in accordance with all applicable laws and statutes. Among these laws are the Cargo Preference Act of 1954, which mandates that at least 50% of cargo generated by the government be carried on privately owned commercial vessels that fly the U.S. flag, and the Military Cargo Preference Act of 1904, which requires all water-transported items intended for military use to be carried by vessels that fly the U.S. flag. To address the need for the ready availability of U.S.-flag, Jones Act-qualified ships, MARAD routinely assists public entities in their efforts to locate such vessels.
  • The Office of Maritime Security – Another MARAD department, the Office of Maritime Security is involved with various efforts to protect the maritime industry from pirates, terrorists, and other criminal threats. MARAD has aided the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Coast Guard in their attempts to combat piracy on the high seas in line with the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Furthermore, the Office is involved with efforts to enforce the National Maritime Domain Awareness Plan (2013), intended to bolster maritime security on the global level, and provides support to the DHS in allocating port security grants to entities at the local and state levels.
  • Office of Safety – This MARAD department is involved with developing safety standards for the national and international maritime industry, as well as promoting advances in practices and technology to protect the welfare of maritime personnel.
  • Port Conveyance and Port Licensing Programs – MARAD helps federal agencies and departments comply with the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, which compels such entities to transfer unneeded property to other agencies that need it. Since the 90s, the Administration has also had the authority to convey this property to state and local governments for the development of port facilities. In addition, MARAD licenses offshore liquefied natural gas and oil import/export port facilities in accordance with the Deepwater Port Act of 1974.
  • National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) – MARAD manages this small fleet of inactive ships for the purpose of providing auxiliary support, as needed, for national emergency response efforts. As of July 31, 2014, the NDRF consisted of 114 ships.2
  • Ready Reserve Force (RRF) – Since 1976, MARAD’s Ready Reserve Force has served a backup support for the U.S. armed forces, especially the Army and Marine Corps. The RRF has been involved in Operation Desert Storm and the Hurricane Katrina response effort.
  • Ship Disposal and Dismantling – MARAD runs a Ship Disposal Program to enable the agency to safely dispose of old vessels that are no longer adequate for national security purposes. The agencies achieve this goal through sales to domestic ship recyclers, participation in the U.S. Navy’s SINKEX “live fire” training exercises, and providing vessels for use as artificial offshore reefs.
  • Federal Ship Financing Program (Title XI) – The agency takes part in Title XI financing, which is intended to bolster the U.S. merchant marine by funding the construction (or reconstruction) of vessels in compliance with environmentally friendly policies. The Program gives ship owners the opportunity to purchase vessels at affordable rates (low interest and long repayment terms) from U.S. shipyards. It also provides financial support to shipyards seeking to modernize their facilities.
  • The United States Merchant Marine Academy – MARAD is responsible for administrating the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA), in Kings Point, NY. This is one of the five military academies charged with the task of producing commissioned officers for the various armed forces. Graduates of the Academy go on to serve in the merchant marine or in the U.S. military. MARAD also provides funding to California Maritime Academy, Great Lakes Maritime Academy, Maine Maritime Academy, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the State University of New York Maritime College, and Texas A&M Maritime Academy.
  • The MARAD History Program – The Maritime Administration is also involved in preserving its own history, as well as that of the U.S. maritime industry as a whole. To that end, it operates the American Merchant Marine Museum and, through the Maritime Administration Artifact Loan Program, lends valuable historical artifacts to non-profit organizations and other public museums. It also maintains the MARAD Vessel History Database, which has data on over 12,000 vessels, past and present.

Given its role in enforcing the provisions of the Jones Act, battling piracy on the high seas, and promoting safety in shipbuilding and maritime employment conditions, the Maritime Administration is a name that sometimes arises in connection with offshore personal injury cases.

If you have or a loved one has been seriously injured while performing duties as a maritime or offshore employee, you should contact the maritime law firm Maintenance & Cure at 1-800-836-5830. A free consultation is available.

Sources

  1. https://www.marad.dot.gov/about-us/maritime-administration-at-a-glance/
  2. https://www.marad.dot.gov/wp-content/uploads/pdf/i140731.pdf
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Maritime Injury Lawyers

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Board Certified Attorneys

We are maritime injury attorneys that have recovered millions for our injured clients. We have always been a strong advocate for maritime personal injury victims and the families of those who are killed while working in service of a vessel or under the Jones Act law. Our concern is for the safety of those involved and helping their families find out the whereabouts and conditions of their loved ones.

These are some of the diverse groups of injured workers we have represented:

  • Jones Act seamen
  • Workers on oil rigs, offshore platforms and jack-up rigs
  • Crews and workers on barges, supply boats, tankers, freighters and other vessels

The list is by no means comprehensive. If you are unsure whether you qualify as a Jones Act seamen or whether you might be covered by other maritime regulations, it’s vital that you contact our maritime lawyers today to learn about your rights.

We have represented workers and their families in the following disasters:

  • Deepwater Horizon Disaster
  • M/V Jillian Morrison Explosion
  • Bouchard Transportation Co. Inc. Barge B No. 125 Explosion
  • British Petroleum Texas City Refinery Explosion
  • Phillips 66 Refinery Explosion

The team of Jones Act attorneys and maritime lawyers at SMSH have over 100 years of combined trial experience. Contact our Jones Act lawyers today for a free, confidential case evaluation.

Why Hire the Worldwide Jones Act, Offshore & Maritime Injury Lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris?

The Jones Act and maritime injury lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris have spent more than five decades representing seamen, longshoremen and other maritime workers, and recovered millions of dollars for our clients. SMSH has always been a strong advocate for maritime personal injury victims and the families of those who are killed while working in service of a vessel. Our concern is for the safety of those involved and helping their families find out the whereabouts and conditions of their loved ones, as well as recovering the compensation they are entitled to for injuries, medical bills and other damages.

Here are some of the reasons why thousands of injured maritime workers have chosen Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris to represent their interests:

  • We have recovered over $620 million dollars for offshore and maritime workers, including recovery of $17.5 million in the largest Jones Act settlement ever paid by the United States government.
  • Each of our Jones Act attorneys and maritime injury lawyers has more than 25 years of experience, with total of more than 100 years of trial experience for the team.
  • Our maritime injury lawyers have represented clients in some of the nation’s worst maritime and refinery disasters, including: the Deepwater Horizon explosion; the M/V Jillian Morrison explosion; the Bouchard Transportation Co. Inc. Barge B No. 125 explosion; the British Petroleum Texas City Refinery explosion; and the Phillips 66 Refinery explosion.
  • As dedicated maritime injury and Jones Act attorneys, we understand the financial difficulties that families often face when a loved one is injured and unable to work. Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris offers interest free loans to assist our clients with day-to-day living expenses while waiting for the conclusion of their case.
  • Our attorneys provide assistance to maritime, offshore and port workers across the United States.
  • We have board certified Personal Injury Trial lawyers.
 

The Maritime Attorney Difference

Maritime and offshore accidents fall under a different set of laws than other personal injury or workers’ compensation claims. There are specific maritime laws that govern claims, including the Jones Act, the Longshoremen and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act and general maritime laws. To receive the full protections these laws offer, it’s crucial to have an attorney who understands the complexities of each. If you’ve been injured while working on a vessel, offshore or in one of the nation’s many ports, contact the Jones Act attorneys at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris today for a free consultation.
Our experienced offshore injury lawyers have handled cases throughout the Gulf of Mexico coastal region of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and represented clients from all 50 states of the United States. We have years of experience representing the crew working on inland waters such as the Mississippi River, Ohio River, Kentucky River, the Great Lakes, Lake Michigan, Lake Superior, Lake Huron, and many more. We have also handled cases worldwide in countries as far away as the Ukraine and Israel. We routinely represent clients from the Central American countries of Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. We have also made claims for clients from Columbia, Venezuela, Bangladesh, The Philippines, Romania, Croatia, England, Ireland, Spain, The Netherlands, Russia, China, Mexico, and Brazil.

Time is of the Essence

If you or a member of your family has been seriously injured or killed as the result of an offshore accident, please speak to a qualified maritime lawyer before talking to your employer or any insurance company or adjuster. If you work on a vessel, boat, barge, tanker, fishing boat, an offshore drilling rig or platform, or any other kind of ship, you may qualify for Jones Act compensation. Working in, on, or near water means you need the specially-trained legal assistance of the Board Certified maritime lawyers of Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris, L.L.P.

A few small tidbits of advice for the injured offshore worker:

  1. Fill out an accident report or incident paperwork as soon as possible after your injury.
  2. If your employer gives you any paperwork to sign, have it reviewed by a competent maritime lawyer so you don’t waive your rights to more money.
  3. Do not give a recorded statement to anyone without first seeking legal counsel.
  4. Do not accept the word of a company doctor as to the extent of your injuries, seek out your own doctor for a second-opinion.
We are Worldwide Jones Act attorneys and Maritime lawyers with over 100 years combined experience in Maritime Personal Injury Cases and we have handled thousands of cases. Your initial consultation for your maritime accident case is FREE. You pay us nothing unless we win your case and get you money. Call a maritime lawyer NOW at 1-800-836-5830 or e-mail us at info@smslegal.com.

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Recent Successful Cases

$17.5 Million in Jones Act Deckhand Case

 

In March 2008, our client was employed as a deckhand in a shipyard. He suffered a head injury.

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$2.5 Million Recovered in Jones Act Case

 

While on stern of tug attempting to hook up a barge, the “L” line became tight, broke, hit our client,

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$1.6 Million Recovered for Offshore Workers

 

On April 20, 2007, while working as blasters, painting an offshore rig on a platform, our two clients injured

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