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$2.5M Recovered for Daughter Of Dredge Worker Killed in Delaware Accident

Matthew Shaffer negotiated a $2.5 million settlement in just 60 days on behalf of the 4-year-old daughter of a crane operator killed in a dredging accident in December.

The worker was on a crane barge on the Christina River in Delaware on Dec. 2, 2014, when the barge capsized, throwing three crewmembers into the water. The 2 other workers were immediately rescued, but the single father from Newport News, Va., drowned when he was unable to escape the crane operating station.

Shaffer filed a claim under the Jones Act and the Death on the High Sease Act on behalf of the worker’s family against the employer, Norfolk Dredging.

“We moved quickly and successfully reached a settlement within 60 days of being retained by the worker’s family,” Shaffer said. “Cases like these usually takes 2 to 3 years to resolve, and sometimes even longer. However, I think the company recognized that there was indisputable negligence and there was also a clear appreciation for this young man. He was such a hard worker, and they knew him and knew the family and wanted to get it resolved as quickly as they could.”

The majority of the $2.5 million settlement will be placed in a trust to protect the financial security of the man’s daughter.

“It was an honor to represent this family and to make sure this little girl will be taken care of, that she’ll be housed, educated and supported for the rest of her life so that her father didn’t die in vain,” Shaffer said.

Read more about the case in our press release.

Captain Dies, 3 Crewmembers Rescued After Tugboat Sinks Off Fire Island In New York

A tugboat captain died and three crewmembers were rescued in March when the vessel sank off New York’s Fire Island.

The U.S. Coast Guard rescued the three crewmembers after one of the men was able to make a cell phone call as the Sea Bear was sinking.

“They had only seconds to let us know before they sank,” said Coast Guard Petty Officer Morgan Gallapis.

Lars Vetland, 43, of Staten Island; Jason Reimer, 38, of Leonardo, New Jersey; and Rainer Bendixen, 22, of Bay Head, New Jersey, were pulled from the stormy, icy waters about a mile off of a section of the island known as Fire Island Pines. The crewmembers were wearing immersion suits and were treated for hypothermia.

The captain, Donald Maloney, wasn’t able to put an immersion suit on before the vessel sank in the 37 degree waters. The Coast Guard, a helicopter, Suffolk County Police Marine Bureau Boats, and two other tug boats assisted in the search for Maloney.

The accident occurred during a storm, but the cause of the sinking was not yet known. The tugboat was among three that were returning to their base after working on a dredging project.

“This tug was in the back of the line when it sank,” Gallapis said. “The other tugs continued without seeing them. They heard the distress call and headed back to assist in the search.”

Ship Sinking Accident Help

A full investigation is key in determining the cause of a vessel sinking. While weather can often be a factor, there are usually other factors that lead to the ship going down.

“When a ship sinks in stormy weather, it’s most often not just because of the storm,” said maritime lawyer Dennis McElwee. “The underlying cause may be Improper crew training, an unseaworthy vessel, improperly loaded cargo, or other issues of negligence.”

The maritime attorneys at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris help crewmembers who have been injured and the families of those killed in ship sinking accidents. Our attorneys conduct an independent investigation to ensure evidence is preserved and analyzed to determine the true cause of the sinking.

Our law firm has extensive experience in maritime worker drowning cases, including a recent case in Wilmington, Delaware, in which a dredge worker drowned.

SMSH attorneys have more than 100 years of combined experience in investigating ship sinkings and other maritime accidents. Our New York maritime lawyers have helped hundreds of seamen and other maritime workers from across the United States to get the maximum compensation possible for their injuries and other damages. Contact us today for a free consultation.

Source: USA Today

2nd Collision Reported in Houston Ship Channel in a Week

For the second time in a week, two ships collided in the Houston Ship Channel. The most recent collision, which happened Monday in foggy conditions, led to a spilling of a gasoline additive and a shelter-in-place order for 300 residents near where the accident occurred.

The 600-foot chemical tanker Carla Maersk and 623-foot bulk carrier Conti Peridot collided about 12:30 p.m. near Morgan’s Point. The collision ruptured three of the Carla Maersk’s port tanks, which lead to a leak of some of the vessel’s 216,000 barrels of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether, or MTBE.

“This chemical, when it’s in liquid form will float on water and is toxic to both people and wildlife – you will smell this chemical long before you reach toxic levels and we encourage anyone on the water to stay away from areas where you can smell this,” U.S. Coast Guard officials said.

The flammable liquid can cause dizziness and suffocation with prolonged exposure, and two dock workers were taken to the hospital after being overcome by fumes.

The leak was contained within a few hours, but it wasn’t yet known how much of the cargo spilled into the channel.

The channel was closed to traffic for three days following the accident, finally reopening Thursday.

The Houston Ship Channel connects the Gulf of Mexico to the Port of Houston, which is home to the nation’s largest and one of the world’s largest petrochemical complexes. About 70 ships travel the channel daily as well as 300 to 400 tugs and barges.

Legal Help For Workers After Maritime Injuries

As was evident in this case, ship accidents can affect a wide range of maritime workers, from the seamen on the vessel to the workers at the dock who were overcome by fumes from the spill.

If you were injured while working aboard a vessel, you may be entitled to maintenance and cure benefits under the Jones Act. Injured dock workers may be entitled to benefits under the Longshore and Harbor Workers Compensation Act.

Toxic exposure can cause both short- and long-term medical problems. If you were affected by exposure to toxic liquids or gases during your work on a vessel or in a port, the Houston maritime lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris can help explain your rights and pursue compensation for your injuries.

With more than 100 years of combined experience, we’ve helped hundreds of clients over the years to recover millions of dollars under the  general maritime laws, the Jones Act and the LHWCA. Contact us today to set up a free consultation.
For the second time in a week, two ships collided in the Houston Ship Channel. The most recent collision, which happened Monday in foggy conditions, led to a spilling of a gasoline additive and a shelter-in-place order for 300 residents near where the accident occurred.

The 600-foot chemical tanker Carla Maersk and 623-foot bulk carrier Conti Peridot collided about 12:30 p.m. near Morgan’s Point. The collision ruptured three of the Carla Maersk’s port tanks, which lead to a leak of some of the vessel’s 216,000 barrels of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether, or MTBE.

“This chemical, when it’s in liquid form will float on water and is toxic to both people and wildlife – you will smell this chemical long before you reach toxic levels and we encourage anyone on the water to stay away from areas where you can smell this,” U.S. Coast Guard officials said.

The flammable liquid can cause dizziness and suffocation with prolonged exposure, and two dock workers were taken to the hospital after being overcome by fumes.

The leak was contained within a few hours, but it wasn’t yet known how much of the cargo spilled into the channel.

The channel was closed to traffic for three days following the accident, finally reopening Thursday.

The Houston Ship Channel connects the Gulf of Mexico to the Port of Houston, which is home to the nation’s largest and one of the world’s largest petrochemical complexes. About 70 ships travel the channel daily as well as 300 to 400 tugs and barges.

Legal Help For Workers After Maritime Injuries

As was evident in this case, ship accidents can affect a wide range of maritime workers, from the seamen on the vessel to the workers at the dock who were overcome by fumes from the spill.

If you were injured while working aboard a vessel, you may be entitled to maintenance and cure benefits under the Jones Act. Injured dock workers may be entitled to benefits under the Longshore and Harbor Workers Compensation Act.

Toxic exposure can cause both short- and long-term medical problems. If you were affected by exposure to toxic liquids or gases during your work on a vessel or in a port, the maritime lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris can help explain your rights and pursue compensation for your injuries.

With more than 100 years of combined experience, we’ve helped hundreds of clients over the years to recover millions of dollars under the  general maritime laws, the Jones Act and the LHWCA. Contact us today to set up a free consultation.

Barge Accident in Florida Leaves 1 Dead

One man was killed and two others were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard after a barge broke in half and sank in Florida’s Fort Pierce Inlet on Tuesday.

The 100-foot barge started taking on water offshore while being towed from Key Biscayne to Georgia by a 54-foot Gulfstream. The vessel diverted into the closest inlet, according to Amanda Phillips, spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission..

“Unfortunately, they came in at a bad time. It was outgoing tide and about in the middle of the inlet the barge took on so much water that one of the pumps stopped and the barge sunk,” Phillips said. She said the vessel had several holes in it and was “not very seaworthy.”

Three people and a dog were aboard the barge, one of whom was pulled under as the vessel sank. The Coast Guard rescued the two other men and dog, and the operator of the boat that towed the barge was not injured.

The barge wreckage is in about 40 foot of water in the inlet, with wreckage possibly as close as 10 feet under the surface. Officials have closed the highly trafficked inlet to through traffic due to safety concerns and have hired an international marine salvage firm to being removing the sunken barge.

Fort Lauderdale-based Resolve Marine Group also assisted in the recovery of the cruise ship Costa Concordia after it sank off the Italian coast in 2012.

Under the Jones Act, barge owners have an obligation to provide a safe and secure vessel, and workers injured on an unstable or poorly maintained barge may have grounds to file a Jones Act unseaworthiness claim or a general maritime lawsuit.

“SMSH recently concluded a case wherein a barge capsized in the Delaware River, killing a deckhand,” said maritime lawyer Matthew Shaffer. “These incidents underscore the very dangerous conditions under which seaman must work.”

The maritime law firm of Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris helps maritime workers who have been injured in U.S. waters and around the world. Our attorneys have represented hundreds of seamen in unseaworthiness claims and recovered substantial compensation for our clients.

Were you injured or a loved one killed because of unsafe work conditions on a barge or other vessel? Contact maritime attorneys Matthew Shaffer and Dennis McElwee today to schedule a free consultation.

Lawsuit Filed For Worker Injured While Evacuated Jack Up Rig

Jones Act lawyer Matthew Shaffer, a managing partner of SMSH, recently filed a lawsuit on behalf of a worker injured on a jack up rig that was hit by another vessel on the Texas-Louisiana border.

The 44-year-old Maryland man was working as a camp boss for Aramark, which was serving as caterer for Spartan Offshore Drilling’s jack up rig while it was docked in Sabine Pass.

Mr. Shaffer’s client job was overseeing catering for the rig’s crew aboard the Spartan 303 jack up rig on April 28, 2014, when the rig was struck by another vessel. The client, along with other workers, evacuated the rig after the accident.

During the evacuation, the client lost his balance and fell on a gangway because of inadequate ingress and egress to the vessel. He suffered injuries to his back and extremities as a result of the fall.

The lawsuit was filed against his employer, Aramark U.S. Offshore Services LLC, as well as against the rig’s owner and operator Spartan Offshore Drilling. The owner and operator of the other vessel, the Grey Fox, was also named in the lawsuit, which was filed under the Jones Act and general maritime laws.

According to the lawsuit, the companies names failed to provide a safe evacuation route and failed to properly train workers in safety and emergency practices. It seeks damages for lost wages, lost earning capacity, medical expenses, maintenance and cure, pain and suffering, and punitive damages for the failure of his employer to provide maintenance and cure.

“This case illustrates that all maritime workers, even those that are in port, are at risk for injury,” Mr. Shaffer said. “The entities responsible for this occurrence owe my clients a debt that is now due and payable.”

Maritime law firm Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris helps clients from across the U.S. and around the world with maritime accident claims. If you were injured while working on a ship, in a port, or on an offshore rig, contact us today for help.

Annual Report Shows Drop In Maritime Piracy In 2014

Around the world, maritime piracy dropped to its lowest level in 8 years in 2014, according to an annual report from London-based group the International Maritime Bureau. Despite that decline, however, ship hijackings in Southeast Asia were up significantly.

Pirates attacked 21 ships last year and took 442 crewmembers hostage, the report notes. This increased from 2013, when 12 ships were attacked and 302 crewmembers taken hostage.

In 2014, a total of 245 pirate attacks were reported. This was a 44 percent decline from 2011, the peak of pirate activity off the coast of Somalia, and from 264 in 2013. Of these total attacks, the former piracy hotspot of Somalia has only 11 reported piracy incidents. Southeast Asia had 124 of the attacks.

“The global increase in hijackings is due to a rise in attacks against coastal tankers in Southeast Asia,” International Maritime Bureau Director Pottengal Mukundan said in a statement. “Gangs of armed thieves have attacked small tankers in the region for their cargoes, many looking specifically for marine diesel and gas oil to steal and then sell.”

Many of the piracy attacks were low-legel thefts perpetrated with guns and long knives; however, 4 crewmembers were killed, 13 injured and 9 taken from the vessels they were working on.

Around the world, maritime piracy dropped to its lowest level in 8 years in 2014, according to an annual report from London-based group the International Maritime Bureau. Despite that decline, however, ship hijackings in Southeast Asia were up significantly.

Pirates attacked 21 ships last year and took 442 crewmembers hostage, the report notes. This increased from 2013, when 12 ships were attacked and 302 crewmembers taken hostage.

In 2014, a total of 245 pirate attacks were reported. This was a 44 percent decline from 2011, the peak of pirate activity off the coast of Somalia, and from 264 in 2013. Of these total attacks, the former piracy hotspot of Somalia has only 11 reported piracy incidents. Southeast Asia had 124 of the attacks.

“The global increase in hijackings is due to a rise in attacks against coastal tankers in Southeast Asia,” International Maritime Bureau Director Pottengal Mukundan said in a statement. “Gangs of armed thieves have attacked small tankers in the region for their cargoes, many looking specifically for marine diesel and gas oil to steal and then sell.”

Many of the piracy attacks were low-legel thefts perpetrated with guns and long knives; however, 4 crewmembers were killed, 13 injured and 9 taken from the vessels they were working on.

Tugboat Sinks Off Hawaii With 75,000 Gallons Of Diesel

The Nalani, a 95-foot tugboat, sank last week off the coast of Oahu while carrying 75,000 gallons of fuel.

The pilot of the ship sent out a mayday call around 3:15 p.m. Jan. 22, reporting to the U.S. Coast Guard command center in Honolulu that the vessel was taking on water.

Upon hearing the call that the Nalani was in danger of sinking, the nearby towing vessel Tiger 7 and an National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration patrol boat came to the rescue of the tugboat’s 11 crewmembers. No injuries were reported. The tugboat sank in about 2,200 feet of water about 2.5 miles off Barbers Point Harbor in Oahu, Hawaii.

Crews were continuing to assess the environmental and health impacts of the ship accident. About 500 gallons of fuel that apparently leaked from the vessel have already been recovered.

4-year-old Nearly Drowns on Royal Caribbean Cruise

A near-drowning incident Saturday on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship has left a 4-year-old boy in critical condition.

The child, on vacation with his parents and sibling, wandered away from his mother on the Oasis of the Seas cruise ship, about an hour after the ship departed Port Everglades. The mother alerted ship authorities and a frantic search began.

The boy was found by a guest underwater in a wave pool. He was pulled from the water and bystanders attempted resuscitation until medical staff arrived and took over CPR.

According to Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue spokesperson Mike Jachles, the child was submerged for approximately five to 10 minutes.

The medical staff took the boy to the infirmary, where his pulse was restored. The ship returned to port Saturday evening and the child, whom authorities identified as Ascanio Azzia of Italy, was taken to a Fort Lauderdale hospital where he was listed in critical condition.

Investigators said foul play was not suspected.

The majority of cruise ships, including Royal Caribbean, don’t provide lifeguards to watch over passengers. A Royal Caribbean spokeswoman said that signs are posted on every vessel that warn passengers to swim at their own risk. However, despite such signs, several children have died or suffered near-drowning experiences on cruise ships in the past few years.

A 4-year-old boy drowned and his 6-year-old brother nearly drowned in February 2014 while on the cruise ship Breakaway, a Norwegian ship on a voyage from New York to the Bahamas.

In an October 2013 incident, a 6-year-old drowned in a pool on the Carnival cruise ship Victory. On a Disney Fantasy cruise ship in March 2013, another 4-year-old boy nearly drowned.

If you’ve gotten sick or been hurt on a cruise, the maritime attorneys at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris can help. Contact us today for a free consultation.

Court Opinion Paves Way for Medical Negligence Claims Against Cruise Ship

Injuries and illness are common occurrences on cruise ships. If you catch the flu or break a bone, your first stop will likely be the ship’s urgent care facility. Staffed by doctors and nurses, these center’s can help fix what ails you. However, just like medical practitioners on land, these professionals can make mistakes and cause your condition to worsen instead of improve.

On land, when a medical professional makes a mistake as the result of negligence, the patient can pursue financial compensation through a medical malpractice claim against the doctor and even the facility he works for. The rules have been different for medical staff on a cruise ship, though. In the past, it was nearly impossible to hold a cruise ship company accountable for medical malpractice by its staff, but a recent court ruling may change that.

In a 63-page opinion from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, Judge Stanley Marcus found that maritime law supports the right of a patient to hold the cruise line accountable for medical negligence.

The opinion stems from a claim filed by the daughter of an elderly cruise ship passenger. The passenger, Pasquale Vaglio, fell during his voyage on the Royal Caribbean cruise ship the Explorer of the Seas. The ship was docked in Bermuda at the time of the incident.

Mr. Vaglio sought treatment with the ship’s medical staff, but fell into a coma and later died. His daughter, Patricia Franza, filed a wrongful death claim against Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. The lawsuit claims that his death was the result of the ship’s medical staff failing to diagnose cranial trauma in a timely manner.

The lawsuit was initially dismissed by Judge Joan A. Leonard in accordance with a long-standing maritime law concept that essentially grants immunity to ship owners from claims of medical malpractice by their medical staff.

When the case landed in the appellate courts, however, the opinion written by Judge Marcus found that maritime law does support the plaintiff’s right to hold Royal Caribbean accountable for the staff’s actions.

In the opinion, Marcus says that the roots of the immunity concept for owners of vessels “ “snake back into a wholly different world. Instead of 19th-century steamships … we now confront state-of-the-art cruise ships that house thousands of people and operate as floating cities, complete with well-stocked modern infirmaries and urgent care centers. In place of truly independent doctors and nurses, we must now acknowledge that medical professionals routinely work for corporate masters.”

The cruise ship injury attorneys at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris provide legal assistance to those who are injured or became ill on pleasure cruises, including passengers and crewmembers.

172 Cruise Passengers, Crew Sickened with Norovirus

After 28 days at sea and 172 people falling ill with norovirus, the cruise ship Crown Princess docked in California over the weekend.

The ship set sail from Los Angeles, traveling to Hawaii and Tahiti. Just a few days into the trip, some aboard started showing signs of the highly contagious gastrointestinal illness.

Norovirus is easily passed through person-to-person contact, and in a close quarters environment like a cruise ship, it can quickly spread, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, body aches and fever. The illness typically lasts about three days.

“As it is the cold and flu season, when the stomach flu circulates on land, we encourage all of our guests to be diligent in following the widely accepted practices of frequent hand washing with soap and water and the use of hand sanitizers,” said Susan Lomax, a company spokeswoman.

On the same ship in April, 129 people contracted norovirus during a seven-day cruise. Lomax said the vessel will undergo a thorough cleaning and disinfecting before its next scheduled voyage.

If you were injured or fell ill while on a cruise, whether as a passenger or crewmember, contact the cruise ship injury lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris to learn your legal rights.

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$2.5M Recovered for Daughter Of Dredge Worker Killed in Delaware Accident

Matthew Shaffer negotiated a $2.5 million settlement in just 60 days on behalf of the 4-year-old daughter of a crane operator killed in a dredging accident in December.

Posted in Jones Act

Captain Dies, 3 Crewmembers Rescued After Tugboat Sinks Off Fire Island In New York

A tugboat captain died and three crewmembers were rescued in March when the vessel sank off New York’s Fire Island.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

2nd Collision Reported in Houston Ship Channel in a Week

For the second time in a week, two ships collided in the Houston Ship Channel, this time leading to a spilling of a gasoline additive and a shelter-in-place order.

Posted in General, Jones Act

Barge Accident in Florida Leaves 1 Dead

One man was killed and two others were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard after a barge broke in half and sank in Florida’s Fort Pierce Inlet on Tuesday.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

Lawsuit Filed For Worker Injured While Evacuated Jack Up Rig

Jones Act lawyer Matthew Shaffer, a managing partner of SMSH, recently filed a lawsuit on behalf of a worker injured on a jack up rig that was hit by another vessel on the Texas-Louisiana border.

Posted in General, Jones Act

Annual Report Shows Drop In Maritime Piracy In 2014

Around the world, maritime piracy dropped to its lowest level in 8 years in 2014, according to an annual report from London-based group the International Maritime Bureau.

Tugboat Sinks Off Hawaii With 75,000 Gallons Of Diesel

The Nalani, a 95-foot tugboat, sank last week off the coast of Oahu while carrying 75,000 gallons of fuel.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

4-year-old Nearly Drowns on Royal Caribbean Cruise

A near-drowning incident Saturday on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship has left a 4-year-old boy in critical condition.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

Court Opinion Paves Way for Medical Negligence Claims Against Cruise Ship

An opinion from the U.S. Court of Appeals found that maritime law supports the right to hold the cruise line accountable for medical negligence.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

172 Cruise Passengers, Crew Sickened with Norovirus

After 28 days at sea and 172 people falling ill with norovirus, the cruise ship Crown Princess docked in California over the weekend.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News
Page 5 of 22« First...34567...1020...Last »
Jones Act Lawyer

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We have board certified personal injury trial lawyers prepared to take on your case. Details

 

bbb

Newsweek Leaders in Maritime
FREE confidential case Evaluation
Contact our experienced maritime attorneys to see if you have a case.

 
 
 
 
 

* Please be aware that your submission of this contact form does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

Jones Act Lawyer

tbls

We have board certified personal injury trial lawyers prepared to take on your case. Details

 

bbb

Newsweek Leaders in Maritime
Recently
Filed Cases

Blog

$2.5M Recovered for Daughter Of Dredge Worker Killed in Delaware Accident

Matthew Shaffer negotiated a $2.5 million settlement in just 60 days on behalf of the 4-year-old daughter of a crane operator killed in a dredging accident in December.

Posted in Jones Act

Captain Dies, 3 Crewmembers Rescued After Tugboat Sinks Off Fire Island In New York

A tugboat captain died and three crewmembers were rescued in March when the vessel sank off New York’s Fire Island.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

2nd Collision Reported in Houston Ship Channel in a Week

For the second time in a week, two ships collided in the Houston Ship Channel, this time leading to a spilling of a gasoline additive and a shelter-in-place order.

Posted in General, Jones Act

Barge Accident in Florida Leaves 1 Dead

One man was killed and two others were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard after a barge broke in half and sank in Florida’s Fort Pierce Inlet on Tuesday.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

Lawsuit Filed For Worker Injured While Evacuated Jack Up Rig

Jones Act lawyer Matthew Shaffer, a managing partner of SMSH, recently filed a lawsuit on behalf of a worker injured on a jack up rig that was hit by another vessel on the Texas-Louisiana border.

Posted in General, Jones Act

Annual Report Shows Drop In Maritime Piracy In 2014

Around the world, maritime piracy dropped to its lowest level in 8 years in 2014, according to an annual report from London-based group the International Maritime Bureau.

Tugboat Sinks Off Hawaii With 75,000 Gallons Of Diesel

The Nalani, a 95-foot tugboat, sank last week off the coast of Oahu while carrying 75,000 gallons of fuel.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

4-year-old Nearly Drowns on Royal Caribbean Cruise

A near-drowning incident Saturday on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship has left a 4-year-old boy in critical condition.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

Court Opinion Paves Way for Medical Negligence Claims Against Cruise Ship

An opinion from the U.S. Court of Appeals found that maritime law supports the right to hold the cruise line accountable for medical negligence.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News

172 Cruise Passengers, Crew Sickened with Norovirus

After 28 days at sea and 172 people falling ill with norovirus, the cruise ship Crown Princess docked in California over the weekend.

Posted in General, Jones Act, News
Page 5 of 22« First...34567...1020...Last »
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Board Certified Attorneys

We are maritime injury attorneys that have recovered millions for our injured clients. We have always been a strong advocate for maritime personal injury victims and the families of those who are killed while working in service of a vessel or under the Jones Act law. Our concern is for the safety of those involved and helping their families find out the whereabouts and conditions of their loved ones.

These are some of the diverse groups of injured workers we have represented:

  • Jones Act seamen
  • Workers on oil rigs, offshore platforms and jack-up rigs
  • Crews and workers on barges, supply boats, tankers, freighters and other vessels

The list is by no means comprehensive. If you are unsure whether you qualify as a Jones Act seamen or whether you might be covered by other maritime regulations, it’s vital that you contact our maritime lawyers today to learn about your rights.

We have represented workers and their families in the following disasters:

  • Deepwater Horizon Disaster
  • M/V Jillian Morrison Explosion
  • Bouchard Transportation Co. Inc. Barge B No. 125 Explosion
  • British Petroleum Texas City Refinery Explosion
  • Phillips 66 Refinery Explosion

The team of Jones Act attorneys and maritime lawyers at SMSH have over 100 years of combined trial experience. Contact our Jones Act lawyers today for a free, confidential case evaluation.

Why Hire the Worldwide Jones Act, Offshore & Maritime Injury Lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris?

The Jones Act and maritime injury lawyers at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris have spent more than five decades representing seamen, longshoremen and other maritime workers, and recovered millions of dollars for our clients. SMSH has always been a strong advocate for maritime personal injury victims and the families of those who are killed while working in service of a vessel. Our concern is for the safety of those involved and helping their families find out the whereabouts and conditions of their loved ones, as well as recovering the compensation they are entitled to for injuries, medical bills and other damages.

Here are some of the reasons why thousands of injured maritime workers have chosen Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris to represent their interests:

  • We have recovered over $620 million dollars for offshore and maritime workers, including recovery of $17.5 million in the largest Jones Act settlement ever paid by the United States government.
  • Each of our Jones Act attorneys and maritime injury lawyers has more than 25 years of experience, with total of more than 100 years of trial experience for the team.
  • Our maritime injury lawyers have represented clients in some of the nation’s worst maritime and refinery disasters, including: the Deepwater Horizon explosion; the M/V Jillian Morrison explosion; the Bouchard Transportation Co. Inc. Barge B No. 125 explosion; the British Petroleum Texas City Refinery explosion; and the Phillips 66 Refinery explosion.
  • As dedicated maritime injury and Jones Act attorneys, we understand the financial difficulties that families often face when a loved one is injured and unable to work. Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris offers interest free loans to assist our clients with day-to-day living expenses while waiting for the conclusion of their case.
  • Our attorneys provide assistance to maritime, offshore and port workers across the United States.
  • We have board certified Personal Injury Trial lawyers.
 

The Maritime Attorney Difference

Maritime and offshore accidents fall under a different set of laws than other personal injury or workers’ compensation claims. There are specific maritime laws that govern claims, including the Jones Act, the Longshoremen and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act and general maritime laws. To receive the full protections these laws offer, it’s crucial to have an attorney who understands the complexities of each. If you’ve been injured while working on a vessel, offshore or in one of the nation’s many ports, contact the Jones Act attorneys at Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer and Harris today for a free consultation.
Our experienced offshore injury lawyers have handled cases throughout the Gulf of Mexico coastal region of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and represented clients from all 50 states of the United States. We have years of experience representing the crew working on inland waters such as the Mississippi River, Ohio River, Kentucky River, the Great Lakes, Lake Michigan, Lake Superior, Lake Huron, and many more. We have also handled cases worldwide in countries as far away as the Ukraine and Israel. We routinely represent clients from the Central American countries of Honduras, El Salvador, and Nicaragua. We have also made claims for clients from Columbia, Venezuela, Bangladesh, The Philippines, Romania, Croatia, England, Ireland, Spain, The Netherlands, Russia, China, Mexico, and Brazil.

Time is of the Essence

If you or a member of your family has been seriously injured or killed as the result of an offshore accident, please speak to a qualified maritime lawyer before talking to your employer or any insurance company or adjuster. If you work on a vessel, boat, barge, tanker, fishing boat, an offshore drilling rig or platform, or any other kind of ship, you may qualify for Jones Act compensation. Working in, on, or near water means you need the specially-trained legal assistance of the Board Certified maritime lawyers of Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris, L.L.P.

A few small tidbits of advice for the injured offshore worker:

  1. Fill out an accident report or incident paperwork as soon as possible after your injury.
  2. If your employer gives you any paperwork to sign, have it reviewed by a competent maritime lawyer so you don’t waive your rights to more money.
  3. Do not give a recorded statement to anyone without first seeking legal counsel.
  4. Do not accept the word of a company doctor as to the extent of your injuries, seek out your own doctor for a second-opinion.
We are Worldwide Jones Act attorneys and Maritime lawyers with over 100 years combined experience in Maritime Personal Injury Cases and we have handled thousands of cases. Your initial consultation for your maritime accident case is FREE. You pay us nothing unless we win your case and get you money. Call a maritime lawyer NOW at 1-800-836-5830 or e-mail us at info@smslegal.com.

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